Ethnologue: Areas: Pacific

Northern Mariana Islands

84,000 (1995). Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (USA). Includes Rota, Aguiguan, Tinian, Saipan, Farallon de Medinilla, Anatahan, Sariguan, Guguan, Alamagan, Pagan, Agrihan, Asuncion, Maug Islands, Farallon de Pajaros. Also includes Japanese 1,600, Korean 5,200, Chinese 5,800, from the Philippines 28,000. Data accuracy estimate: B. The number of languages listed for Northern Mariana Islands is 3.

CAROLINIAN (SAIPAN CAROLINIAN, SOUTHERN CAROLINIAN) [CAL] 3,000 (1990 census). Saipan, Pagan, and Agrihan islands, Carolines. Austronesian, Malayo-Polynesian, Central-Eastern, Eastern Malayo-Polynesian, Oceanic, Central-Eastern Oceanic, Remote Oceanic, Micronesian, Micronesian Proper, Ponapeic-Trukic, Trukic. Semi-official status. Active language use. All speakers on Saipan are bilingual in Chamorro. Most also speak English. Southern Carolinian has 95% lexical similarity with Satawal, 88% with Woleaian and Puluwat; 81% with Mortlockese; 78% with Trukese, 74% with Ulithian. Dictionary. Fishermen mainly; agriculturalists: vegetables; livestock: cattle, pigs, goats.

CHAMORRO (TJAMORO) [CJD] 14,205 in Northern Mariana Islands (1990), including 11,466 on Saipan (1990); 1,502 on Rota (1990); 1,231 on Tinian (1990); 62,500 on Guam (1991 Bender and Rehg); 78,000 in all countries; 90,000 including second language speakers (1987 UBS). Austronesian, Malayo-Polynesian, Western Malayo-Polynesian, Chamorro. Slight dialect differences. It is a trade language on Saipan. Some bilingualism in English. Dictionary. Grammar. Christian. Bible portions 1908-1992. Work in progress.

TANAPAG (NORTHERN CAROLINIAN, TALABWOG) [TPV] West central coast of Saipan, Tanapag community. Austronesian, Malayo-Polynesian, Central-Eastern, Eastern Malayo-Polynesian, Oceanic, Central-Eastern Oceanic, Remote Oceanic, Micronesian, Micronesian Proper, Ponapeic-Trukic, Trukic. Close to Namonuito of Micronesia. Speakers have limited bilingual proficiency in English. Members of the ethnic group under 30 do not speak Tanapag, but Chamorro. Others are bilingual in Chamorro. They are working to promote Tanapag.


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Part of the Ethnologue, 13th Edition, Barbara F. Grimes, Editor.
Copyright © 1996, Summer Institute of Linguistics, Inc. All rights reserved.

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