Austria

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Alemannic
[gsw] Vorarlberg state. 300,000 in Austria (1991 A. Schmidt). Status: 5 (Developing). Dialects: High Alemannisch (Hochalemannisch). Classification: Indo-European, Germanic, West, High German, German, Upper German, Alemannic

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Austrian Sign Language
[asq] Scattered. 8,000 (2014 EUD). 8,000–10,000 Deaf sign language users (2014 EUD), 39,500 deaf (2014 IMB). Status: 5 (Developing). Recognized language (2000, Constitution, Section 8(3) as amended). Alternate Names: Carinthian Sign Language, KGS, OEGS, ÖGS, Österreichische Gebärdensprache Dialects: Substantial regional variation: Vienna, Carinthia, Styria, others. Partially intelligible with French Sign Language [fsl]. Russian Sign Language [rsl] is historically connected to it. Fingerspelling system similar to French Sign Language [fsl]. Classification: Deaf sign language Comments: Originated in 1870. Sign language classes for hearing people, including at two universities. CD-ROM lessons. Christian (Roman Catholic).

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Bavarian
[bar] Lower Austria and Salzburg states; Northern Bavarian dialect; Burgenland, Carinthia, and Styria. 7,830,000 in Austria (European Commission 2012). Population total all countries: 14,089,000. Status: 5 (Developing). Alternate Names: Bairisch, Bavarian Austrian, Bayerisch, Ost-Oberdeutsch Dialects: Central Bavarian (Danube Bavarian), North Bavarian (Upper Franconian), Salzburgish, South Bavarian. Classification: Indo-European, Germanic, West, High German, German, Upper German, Bavarian-Austrian Comments: Dialects: North Bavarian north of Regensburg, to Nuremburg and Western Bohemia, Czech Republic; South Bavarian in Bavarian Alps, Tyrol, Styria, including the Heanzian dialect of Burgenland, Carinthia, northern Italy, and part of Gottschee.

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Croatian
[hrv] Burgenland, Lower Austria and Vienna states. 19,400 in Austria (2001 census). Status: 6b (Threatened). Statutory language of provincial identity in Burgenland, Styria regions (1955, Treaty of Vienna). Dialects: Burgenland Croatian. Classification: Indo-European, Balto-Slavic, Slavic, South, Western Comments: Croatian spoken in Burgenland differs extensively from that spoken in the Republic of Croatia and intelligibility is difficult. Some dialects heavily influenced by German [deu]. Christian.

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German, Standard
[deu] Vorarlberg state. Status: 1 (National). Statutory national language (1929, Constitution, Article 8), constitution reinstated 1945. Dialects: Kärntnerisch. Classification: Indo-European, Germanic, West, High German, German, Middle German, East Middle German

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Hungarian
[hun] Burgenland, Lower Austria, Styria, and Vienna states. 25,900 in Austria (2001 census). Ethnic population: 60,000 (Laakso 2013). Status: 4 (Educational). Statutory language of provincial identity in 7 districts in Burgenland (1976, Ethnic Groups Act, Articles 13–15). Alternate Names: Magyar Dialects: Oberwart. Classification: Uralic

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Romani, Sinte
[rmo] 4,350 in Austria (2001 census). Status: 2 (Provincial). Statutory language of national identity (1993, Federal Act of 16 December). Alternate Names: Rommanes, Sinte, Sinti Classification: Indo-European, Indo-Iranian, Indo-Aryan, Central zone, Romani, Northern Comments: Christian.

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Slovak
[slk] 3,340 in Austria (2001 census). Status: 5 (Dispersed). Statutory language of national identity (1976, Ethnic Groups Act, Article 1(2)). Classification: Indo-European, Balto-Slavic, Slavic, West, Czech-Slovak

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Slovene
[slv] Carinthia and Styria states. 18,000 in Austria (2001 census). Status: 5 (Dispersed). Statutory language of provincial identity in South Carinthia (1955, Treaty of Vienna). Alternate Names: Slovenian, “Windisch” (pej.) Classification: Indo-European, Balto-Slavic, Slavic, South, Western Comments: Most do not consider themselves Slovenians, but Carinthians, belonging to the German culture. Separated by the Karawanken Mountains from the larger group of Slovenes in Slovenia. Formerly called “Windisch” pejoratively, an archaic form of Slovene, heavily influenced by German. Some use dialects, but others losing dialect knowledge. Many hear standard Slovene in church.

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Swabian
[swg] Tyrol state: Ruette district, around the town of Ruette. Status: 5 (Developing). Classification: Indo-European, Germanic, West, High German, German, Upper German, Alemannic

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Walser
[wae] Tyrol state: Paznauntal area; Brandnertal, Silbertal, Reintal, Schricken, Lech, Warth, Galtur; Vorarlberg state: Grosses Walsertal, Kleinwalsertal, Tannberg areas;. 8,080 in Austria (2000). Status: 6b (Threatened). Alternate Names: Walscher Classification: Indo-European, Germanic, West, High German, German, Upper German, Alemannic

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