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Aromanian
[rup] Pazardzhit province: Peshtera, Velingrad, and Rakitovo municipalities; Kyustendil province: Rakitovo municipaity; Blagoevgrad province. 16,000 in Bulgaria (2004 J. Leclerc). Status: 6a (Vigorous). Alternate Names: Armani, Armina, Armini, Arumanian, Macedo, Macedo-Rumanian, Romanian. Classification: Indo-European, Italic, Romance, Eastern. Comments: Non-indigenous. Refers to those whose relatives emigrated from Macedonia and northern Greece between 1850 and 1914. Romanian Cultural Institute was closed in 1948.

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Balkan Gagauz Turkish
[bgx] Silistra province: Dulova municipality, near Isperih town; Gajal dialect: Deli Orman area. Status: 7 (Shifting). Dialects: Gajal. Classification: Turkic, Southern, Turkish. Comments: Non-indigenous.

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Bulgarian
[bul] 7,020,000 in Bulgaria (European Commission 2012). Total users in all countries: 7,895,240. Status: 1 (National). Statutory national language (1991, Constitution, Article 3). Alternate Names: Balgarski. Dialects: Palityan (Bogomil, Palitiani). Palityan dialect is functionally intelligible with standard Bulgarian. The Pomak dialect spoken in Greece is reportedly similar to Serbian [srp] and Bulgarian; geographical dialect variation toward each. Classification: Indo-European, Balto-Slavic, Slavic, South, Eastern. Comments: Christian.

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Bulgarian Sign Language
[bqn] Scattered. 37,000 (2014 IMB). 50,000 sign language users (2014 EUD). Status: 5 (Developing). Alternate Names: Balgarski žestomimičen ezik, BŽE. Dialects: None known. Different sign languages are used in school and by adults outside. Classification: Sign language. Comments: 200 working sign language interpreters (2014 EUD). Instruction for parents of deaf children available. Christian.

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Crimean Tatar
[crh] Dobrich province: Krushari municipality. 1,370 in Bulgaria (2011 census). Status: 5 (Developing). Alternate Names: Crimean, Crimean Turkish, Qirim, Qirimtatar. Dialects: Northern Crimean (Crimean Nogai, Steppe Crimean), Central Crimean, Southern Crimean. Classification: Turkic, Southern. Comments: Non-indigenous. Muslim.

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Gagauz
[gag] Dobrich province: Krusheri and Dobrich municipalities; Silistra province: Kaybardzha and Atafar municipalities; Varna province: Aksakovo municipality. 5,000 in Bulgaria (Salminen 2007). Status: 5 (Developing). Alternate Names: Gagauzi. Dialects: Bulgar Gagauz, Maritime Gagauz. Classification: Turkic, Southern, Turkish. Comments: Non-indigenous. Christian.

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Macedonian
[mkd] Blagoevgrad province: Strumjani, Simitli, and Blagoevgrad minicipalities. 1,400 in Bulgaria (2011 census). Status: 5 (Dispersed). Classification: Indo-European, Balto-Slavic, Slavic, South, Eastern. Comments: Some in Pirin Region claim Macedonian as L1 (1998 W. Brown).

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Romani, Balkan
[rmn] Scattered near urban areas; Burgas, Gabrovo, Sliven, Sofiya, and Sofiya-Grad provinces; Stara Zagora province: Kazanlak municipality; Central dialect is from Sofia to the Black Sea; Tinsmiths’ dialect is in central and northwest Bulgaria; Arlija in Sofia region. 281,000 in Bulgaria (2011 census). 100,000 Arlija, 20,000 Dzambazi, 10,000 Tinsmiths, 10,000 East Bulgarian. L2 users: 200,000 in Bulgaria (Gunnemark and Kenrick 1985). Status: 6a (Vigorous). Alternate Names: Gypsy. Dialects: Arli, Tinners Romani, Greek Romani, Dzambazi, East Bulgarian Romani, Paspatian, Ironworker Romani. Classification: Indo-European, Indo-Iranian, Indo-Aryan, Intermediate Divisions, Western, Romani, Balkan. Comments: Non-indigenous. Ethnic groups: Jerlídes (western Bulgaria), Drindári (central Bulgaria). Muslim.

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Romani, Vlax
[rmy] 1,830 in Bulgaria (2011 census). Status: 5 (Developing). Alternate Names: Rom. Classification: Indo-European, Indo-Iranian, Indo-Aryan, Intermediate Divisions, Western, Romani, Vlax. Comments: Non-indigenous. Christian.

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Turkish
[tur] Burgas province: Kameno, east Sredets, Sozopol, Malko Tarnovo, and Tsarevo municipalities; Khaskovo and Kurdzhali provincesSmolyan province: Madan, Banite, and Nedelino municipalities; also in Stara Zagora and Yambol provinces, small border areas. 606,000 in Bulgaria (2011 census). Status: 5 (Dispersed). Recognized language (1991, National Education Act , No. 86/18.10.1991), Allows mother-tongue education in primary grades 1–8 for Turkish speakers. Alternate Names: Osmanli, Turki. Dialects: Danubian, Razgrad, Dinler, Macedonian Turkish. Classification: Turkic, Southern, Turkish. Comments: Gradually being replaced by Bulgarian [bul], although Islam and ethnic identity remain strong. Natural growth balanced by emigration to Turkey. Muslim.

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