Bahamas

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Bahamas Creole English
[bah] 225,000 in Bahamas (1987). Status: 6a (Vigorous). De facto language of national identity. Alternate Names: Bahamian Creole English, Bahamian Dialect Dialects: None known. Good comprehension of and reportedly very similar to Sea Island Creole [gul] and Afro-Seminole [afs] in the United States (Hancock 1980). Major differences with Sea Island are in phonology, a few words, regional expressions, grammatical differences (verbal markers). There is a spectrum of varieties from standard American English usage to creole (Todd and Hancock 1986). Classification: Creole, English based, Atlantic, Eastern, Northern Comments: There is a continuum of variation from basilectal Creole to acrolectal English [eng] of the educated. Christian.

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English
[eng] 49,300 in Bahamas (2004). Status: 1 (National). De facto national language. Classification: Indo-European, Germanic, West, English Comments: When Creole languages exist alongside their lexifier language, as in the Bahamas, a continuum forms of variations between the Creole and the lexifier language. It is therefore difficult to substantiate the number of Creole speakers and English speakers.

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