Honduras

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Ch’orti’
[caa] Copán Department, along the Guatemala border. 10 in Honduras (1997 R. Reeck). Status: 8b (Nearly extinct). Classification: Mayan, Yucatecan-Core Mayan, Core Mayan, Cholan-Tzeltalan, Cholan, Chorti-Cholti

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English
[eng] Islas de la Bahía Department, and large cities along north mainland coast. 31,500 in Honduras (2001). 22,500 Bay Islands English speakers on the north coast. Status: 5 (Dispersed). Dialects: Bay Islands English. Classification: Indo-European, Germanic, West, English Comments: Some creole influence.

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Garifuna
[cab] North coast between Masca, Cortes Department, and Plaplaya, Gracias a Dios Department; also includes Atlántida, Colón, and Islas de la Bahía (Roatan island) departments, as well as cities La Ceiba, San Pedro Sula, Tegucigalpa, and Puerto Cortés; 37 villages in Honduras, 46 elsewhere in Central America. 98,000 in Honduras (Rivas 1993). Population total all countries: 195,800. 100 monolinguals. Status: 5 (Developing). Alternate Names: Black Carib, Caribe, Central American Carib, Garífuna, Island Carib Dialects: Eastern Garifuna, Western Garifuna. Eastern Garifuna dialect is in Honduras and Nicaragua (leaves out, r, and tends to shorten words), Western Garifuna in Guatemala and Belize. Related to Island Carib [car], with Spanish [spa], English [eng], and French [fra] borrowings. Classification: Maipurean, Northern, Maritime, Ta-Maipurean, Iñeri Comments: Christian, traditional religion.

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Honduras Sign Language
[hds] Scattered. Status: 5 (Developing). Alternate Names: Honduran Sign Language, Lengua de Señas Hondureñas, LESHO Dialects: Regional variations: deaf people along the North coast have some distinct signs from deaf people in the southern part of the country. Classification: Deaf sign language

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Lenca
[len] La Paz, Intibucá, Lempira, Comayagua, Valle and Francisco Morazán departments. No known L1 speakers. Some semi-speakers (Adelaar 2007). Ethnic population: 100,000. Status: 9 (Dormant). Dialects: None known. Some considered it Macro-Chibchan. Classification: Lencan

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Mayangna
[yan] Gracias a Dios and Olancho departments, between the Patuca and Wanki rivers; also in Colón Department, southeast corner. 700 in Honduras (1997 SIL). Ethnic population: 1,030 (McSweeney 2002). Status: 5 (Developing). Alternate Names: Sumu Dialects: Twahka. Classification: Misumalpan

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Mískito
[miq] Gracias a Dios and Olancho departments, south, Coco river watershed; coastal area, northwest from Puerto Lempira into Colón Department. 29,000 in Honduras (Rivas 1993). Status: 5 (Developing). Alternate Names: Marquito, Mískitu, Mísquito, Mosquito Classification: Misumalpan

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Pech
[pay] North central coast, Colón Department, near Caribbean coast, inland; Olancho Department, Dulce Nombre de Culmi and Catamacas municipalities. 990 (Rivas 1993). Ethnic population: 2,590 (Rivas 1993). Status: 8a (Moribund). Alternate Names: Paya, Seco Classification: Chibchan, Chibchan B Comments: Much community interest to preserve the Pech language, and some work is being done to preserve it.

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Spanish
[spa] 5,900,000 in Honduras (2014). L2 users: 112,000 in Honduras (2014). Status: 1 (National). Statutory national language (1982, Constitution, Article 6). Alternate Names: Castellano, Español Classification: Indo-European, Italic, Romance, Italo-Western, Western, Gallo-Iberian, Ibero-Romance, West Iberian, Castilian

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Tol
[jic] North-central, northern Francisco Morazán Department, Montaña de la Flor; Yoro. 350 (1997). Ethnic population: 19,600 (1990 Educación Comunitaria para la Salud-Honduras). 19,000 in Yoro Department. Status: 5 (Developing). Alternate Names: Jicaque, Tolpan, Xicaque Dialects: No distinct dialects. It may be distantly related to Subtiaba [sut] of Nicaragua (no remaining speakers), Malinaltepec Me’phaa [tcf] of Mexico, or the Hokan languages. Classification: Jicaquean Comments: Christian, traditional religion.

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