Norway

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Finnish, Kven
[fkv] Troms and Finnmark counties: Ruija, Kveeniland; Tromso; Oteren, Skibotn, Storslett, Kvaenangsbotn, Nordreisa, Alta, Borselv, Neiden, Bygoynes, and Vadso. 1,500 (Laakso 2013). Status: 6b (Threatened). Alternate Names: Kven, North Finnish Dialects: Considered Old Finnish, speakers of Tornedalen [fit] and Kven recognize the differences between the two. Standard Finnish [fin] speakers generally understand, except some vocabulary. Reportedly more similar to Tornedalen Finnish than to standard Finnish. Various dialects: northwest coast varieties differ from east. Kven integrates Norwegian [nor] loans, whereas Tornedalen has integrated Swedish [swe] loans. Classification: Uralic, Finnic Comments: Christian (Laestadian).

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Norwegian
[nor] 4,640,000 in Norway. Population total all countries: 4,741,780. Status: 1 (National). De facto national language. Alternate Names: Norsk Classification: Indo-European, Germanic, North, East Scandinavian, Danish-Swedish, Danish-Bokmal Comments: Norwegian has 2 written standards, both of which are assigned codes in the ISO 639-3 standard: Bokmål Norwegian (nob) and Nynorsk Norwegian (nno). Bokmål differs from Nynorsk in numerous details in the lexicon, morphosyntax and the use of diphthongs versus single vowels. These written norms have neither a precise geographical delineation nor a direct correspondence with spoken dialects, although Nynorsk is closer to the western dialects and is more in use in western Norway. The written norms are grammatically and lexically very similar. Nynorsk, used by a minority of Norwegians, can be classified as West Scandinavian; Bokmål, the written standard of the majority of the population, tends towards East Scandinavian. Thus, Norwegian draws lexicon and syntax from both West Scandinavian and East Scandinavian speech varieties.

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Norwegian Sign Language
[nsl] Scattered. 2,500 (2014 EUD). 4,000 (Van Cleve 1986). 5,000 (2010 Norwegian Association of the Deaf). 2,500 sign language users (2014 EUD). 22,000 deaf (2014 IMB). Status: 5 (Developing). Alternate Names: Norsk Tegnspråk, NTS Dialects: Holmestrand, Oslo, Trondheim. Dialects associated with 3 schools: Holmestrand, Oslo, Trondheim. Intelligible with Danish [dsl] and Swedish [swl] sign languages with only moderate difficulty. Not intelligible with Finnish Sign Language [fse]. Classification: Deaf sign language Comments: Teachers required to take a one-year full-time university course in sign language. Parents of deaf children offered 40 weeks of sign language instruction free of charge (Timmermans 2005). Many classes for hearing people. Fingerspelling system similar to French Sign Language [fsl]. Right of deaf children to education in and about Norwegian Sign Language recognized by law in 1997 and 1999 (Timmerman 2005:64–65). 500 working sign language interpreters (2014 EUD). Museums of the Deaf in Trondheim and in Bergen. Christian (Protestant).

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Norwegian, Traveller
[rmg] Sør-Trøndelag county: south of Trondheim. Status: 6a (Vigorous). Alternate Names: Norwegian Traveller, Rodi Dialects: None known. Based on Norwegian [nor] with heavy lexical borrowing from Northern Romani varieties and German Rotwelsch [rmd]. Not intelligible with Angloromani [rme]. Classification: Mixed language, Norwegian-Romani Comments: Spoken by the Fanter, who are not Gypsies, but intermarried with Gypsies and Yeniche (German Travellers). Romani influence from speakers descended from the first diaspora from India. Romani people were abandoned on the coast of Norway from British ships from 1544 onwards.

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Romani, Vlax
[rmy] Oslo county. 500 in Norway (Johnstone 1993). Ethnic population: 3,500. Status: 5 (Developing). Dialects: Lovari. Classification: Indo-European, Indo-Iranian, Indo-Aryan, Central zone, Romani, Vlax Comments: Christian.

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Saami, Lule
[smj] Nordland county: Tysfjord, Hamaroy, and Folden. 500 in Norway (Krauss 1992). 1,000–2,000 speakers in Norway and Sweden (Salminen 2007). Ethnic population: 1,000 (1995 M. Krauss). Status: 6b (Threatened). Alternate Names: Lule, Saame Classification: Uralic, Sami, Western, Northern

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Saami, North
[sme] Finnmark, Troms counties; Nordland county: Ofoten. 20,000 in Norway (Laakso 2013). Population total all countries: 25,700. Ethnic population: 30,000 (1995 M. Krauss). 30,000–40,000. Status: 2 (Provincial). Statutory provincial language in Sami Administrative District (1987, Sami Act, No. 12, Article 3). Alternate Names: “Lapp” (pej.), North Sámi, “Northern Lappish” (pej.), Northern Saami, “Norwegian Lapp” (pej.), Saami, Same, Sámegiella, Samic Dialects: Ruija, Sea Lappish, Torne. Two-thirds of all Saami speak Ruija dialect. Classification: Uralic, Sami, Western, Northern Comments: Formerly called “Finns” which they consider derogatory.

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Saami, Pite
[sje] Nordland county: between Saltenfjord and Ranenfjord. Status: 8b (Nearly extinct). Alternate Names: “Lapp” (pej.), Pite Classification: Uralic, Sami, Western, Northern

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Saami, South
[sma] Hedmark county: near Femunden and Rostvolden; Nord-Trøndelag county: southwest of Linneset. 300 in Norway (Krauss 1992). Ethnic population: 600. Status: 6b (Threatened). Alternate Names: “Northern Lappish” (pej.), “Norwegian Lapp” (pej.), Saami, Same, Samic Classification: Uralic, Sami, Western, Southern

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