Serbia

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Albanian, Gheg
[aln] Kosovo. 1,630,000 in Serbia. Population total all countries: 3,486,100. Ethnic population: 2,000,000 (1998 Los Angeles Times). Status: 2 (Provincial). Statutory language of provincial identity in Bjanovac, 2 other municipalities (2009, Constitution, Article 10(2)). De facto provincial language in Kosovo. Alternate Names: Geg, Shqip, Shqyp Dialects: Gheg, Northeast, Gheg, Northwest. There is a transitional dialect zone which is neither Gheg Albanian nor Tosk Albanian [als]. It is spoken in a few towns and villages around the Shkumbin River such as Shpat and Sulovë. A member of macrolanguage Albanian [sqi]. Classification: Indo-European, Albanian, Gheg Comments: Muslim, Christian.

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Aromanian
[rup] Belgrade, Vojvodine and Kosovo. 15,000 in Serbia ( Society of Aromanians). Status: 6a (Vigorous). Alternate Names: Macedo Romania Classification: Indo-European, Italic, Romance, Eastern

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Bosnian
[bos] 135,000 in Serbia (2002). Status: 5 (Dispersed). Statutory language of provincial identity in Bujanovac, Medveda, Presevo (1991, Official Language Use Law No. 45, Article 3). Dialects: Ijekavían, Ikavian. Classification: Indo-European, Slavic, South, Western Comments: Influences from Turkish [tur] and Arabic [arb].

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Bulgarian
[bul] Dmitrovgrad and Bosiljgrad districts. 60,000 in Serbia (2006). Status: 2 (Provincial). Statutory provincial language in Novi Pazar, Sjenica, Tutin (1991, Official Language Use Law No. 45, Article 3). Classification: Indo-European, Slavic, South, Eastern

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Croatian
[hrv] 114,000 in Serbia (2006). Status: 2 (Provincial). Statutory provincial language in Autonomous Province Vodjvodina (2009, Autonomous Province Vodjvodina Statute, Article 26). Classification: Indo-European, Slavic, South, Western

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Czech
[ces] 40,000 in Serbia (2006). Status: 5 (Dispersed). Alternate Names: Bohemian, Cestina Classification: Indo-European, Slavic, West, Czech-Slovak

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Hungarian
[hun] Vojvodine. 287,000 in Serbia (2002 census). Status: 2 (Provincial). Statutory language of national identity (2009, Constitution, Articles 10(2), 199). Statutory provincial language in Autonomous Province Vodjvodina (2009, Autonomous Province Vodjvodina Statute, Article 26). Alternate Names: Magyar Classification: Uralic

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Romani, Balkan
[rmn] Balkans, Kosovo. 120,000 in Serbia. 100,000 Arlija, 20,000 Dzambazi. Population total all countries: 589,800. Status: 5 (Developing). Dialects: Arlija, Dzambazi, Tinners Romani. Arlija dialect (252,000–367,000 total) understood by Greek Romani and Dzambazi. A member of macrolanguage Romany [rom]. Classification: Indo-European, Indo-Iranian, Indo-Aryan, Central zone, Romani, Balkan Comments: Ethnic group: Jerlídes (Macedonia, southern Serbia). Muslim.

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Romani, Sinte
[rmo] Kosovo. 31,000 in Serbia. 30,000 Serbian, 1,000 Manouche. Population total all countries: 318,920. Status: 5 (Developing). Alternate Names: Sinte, Sinti Dialects: Abbruzzesi, Serbian Romani, Slovenian-Croatian Romani. Mutual intelligibility between Croatian Romani, Slovenian Romani, and Serbian Romani. Possibly quite distinct from German [deu] varieties. Sinte is characterized by German influence. Not intelligible of Vlax Romani [rmy]. A member of macrolanguage Romany [rom]. Classification: Indo-European, Indo-Iranian, Indo-Aryan, Central zone, Romani, Northern Comments: Ethnic autonym: Sasítka Romá. Christian.

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Romanian
[ron] Vojvodine; Timoc valley. 200,000 in Serbia (1995 I. Bena). Status: 2 (Provincial). Statutory provincial language in Autonomous Province Vodjvodina (2009, Autonomous Province Vodjvodina Statute, Article 26). Alternate Names: Daco-Rumanian, Moldavian, Rumanian Classification: Indo-European, Italic, Romance, Eastern

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Romano-Serbian
[rsb] 172,000 (2006). Status: 6a (Vigorous). Alternate Names: Tent Gypsy Dialects: None known. Related to Serbian [srp] with influences from Romani. Classification: Mixed language, Serbian-Romani

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Rusyn
[rue] Voyvodina, concentrated in Ruski Krstur town. 30,000 in Serbia (2006). Status: 6a (Vigorous). Statutory language of provincial identity in Autonomous Province Vodjvodina (2009, Autonomous Province Vodjvodina Statute, Article 26). Alternate Names: Carpathian, Carpatho-Rusyn, Rusynski, Ruthenian Classification: Indo-European, Slavic, East

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Serbian
[srp] 6,620,000 in Serbia (2002 census). Population total all countries: 8,957,906. Status: 1 (National). Statutory national language (2006, Constitution, Article 10(1)). Alternate Names: Montenegrin Dialects: Shtokavski (Stokavian), Torlakian. A member of macrolanguage Serbo-Croatian [hbs]. Classification: Indo-European, Slavic, South, Western Comments: Previously considered a Serbo-Croat language. Torlakian spoken in south and east. Influence from Bulgarian [bul]. Some linguists consider it transitional between Shtokavski and Macedonian [mkd]. Christian (Orthodox).

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Serbo-Croatian
[hbs] Population total all languages: 17,057,286. Comments: Includes: Bosnian [bos] (Bosnia and Herzegovina), Croatian [hrv] (Croatia), Serbian [srp].

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Slovak
[slk] Vojvodine. 80,000 in Serbia (1996 W. Brown). Status: 2 (Provincial). Statutory provincial language in Autonomous Province Vodjvodina (2009, Autonomous Province Vodjvodina Statute, Article 26). Classification: Indo-European, Slavic, West, Czech-Slovak

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Yugoslavian Sign Language
[ysl] 30,000 users out of 60,000 deaf persons in former larger Yugoslavia (Van Cleve 1986). Status: 6a (Vigorous). Alternate Names: Slovenian Sign Language Dialects: Serbian Sign Language. Origin from deaf schools in Austria and Hungary. Regional variants, but adequate comprehension. Efforts to standardize since 1979. Slovenian Sign Language [ysl] used in Slovenia is a dialect. Possibly includes Croatian Sign Language [csq] and sign languages in other Balkan states (Bickford 2005); further research is needed especially to determine if these are dialects of the same language or separate languages. Classification: Deaf sign language

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