Spain

Print
Aragonese
[arg] Zaragoza, Huesca Province; Pyrenea (north border), Navarra (west border); north of Montsó (east). Western Aragonese dialect: Ansó, Echo, Chasa, Berdún, and Chaca towns; Central Aragonese dialect: Panticosa, Biescas, Torla, Broto, Bielsa, Yebra, and L’Ainsa; Eastern Aragonese in Benás (Benasque, Benasc, Patués), Plan, Bisagorri, Campo, Perarruga, Graus, and Estadilla; Southern Aragonese in Agüero, Ayerbe, Rasal, Bolea, Lierta, Uesca, Almudébar, Nozito, Labata, Alguezra, Angüés, Pertusa, Balbastro, and Nabal. 10,000 (Salminen 2007). 500 monolinguals (1993). Older adults. Ethnic population: 2,000,000 (1994). L2 users: 20,000 (1993 Counsel of the Aragonese Language). Status: 6b (Threatened). Alternate Names: Altoaragonés, Aragoieraz, Aragonés, Fabla Aragonesa, High Aragonese, Patués Dialects: Central Aragonese (Belsetán, Bergotés, Pandicuto, Tensino), Eastern Aragonese (Benasqués, Chistabino, Fobano, Grausino, Ribagorzano), Southern Aragonese (Ayerbense, Semontanés), Western Aragonese (Ansotano, Cheso). Different from Spanish local variety (also called Aragonese influenced by High Aragonese). Eastern Aragonese transitional to Catalan [cat]. Reportedly, similarities to Catalan and Occitan [oci]. Classification: Indo-European, Italic, Romance, Italo-Western, Western, Pyrenean-Mozarabic, Pyrenean Comments: Aragonese Speakers’ League (Ligallo de Fablans de l’Aragonés) in Zaragoza; Council of the Aragonese Language (Consello d’a Fabla Aragonesa) in Uesca. 6 organizations or more of L1 speakers working in the language. Written language based on Central and Eastern Aragonese. Christian.

More Information

Asturian
[ast] Asturias, Cantabria, Castille and Leon autonomous communities; Montañes dialect: western Cantabria and Las Peñamelleras. Pasiegan dialect: eastern Cantabria and Espinosa de los Monteros, Burgos. 100,000 in Spain (Salminen 2007). 50,000 in Central Asturian, 30,000 in Western Asturian, 20,000 in Eastern Asturian. Population total all countries: 110,000. Ethnic population: 550,000 (1996). L2 users: 450,000 in Spain (1994 F. Botas). Status: 6b (Threatened). Alternate Names: Asturian-Leonese, Asturianu, Astur-Leonese Dialects: Central Asturian (Bable), Eastern Asturian, Leonese (Lleones), Montañes, Pasiegan (Pasiegu), Western Asturian. As different from Spanish [spa] as Galician [glg] or Catalan [cat]; more different than Murcian and Andalusian dialects. About 80% intelligibility with Spanish (1989 R. Hall) enough to cause disruption of communicative ability (1992 T. Erickson). The Vaqueiros ethnic group speaks Western Asturian. Functional intelligibility among the 3 dialects. Reportedly similar to Mirandés [mwl] in Portugal. Leonese may be a separate language. Central Asturian is considered the model, and has the most speakers. Classification: Indo-European, Italic, Romance, Italo-Western, Western, Gallo-Iberian, Ibero-Romance, West Iberian, Asturo-Leonese Comments: About 43% immigrated into the region from the south since the 1950s, and have not absorbed Asturian culture or language. There is literature, both popular and literary, since the 17th century; poetry, traditional ballads, and chivalric novels of oral tradition. The Academy of the Asturian Language formed in 1981 to revive the academy of the 18th century. Western Asturian may need orthography adaptation. Montañes is a Spanish dialect with Asturian influence.

More Information

Basque
[eus] País Vasco autonomous community: Alava, Bizkaia, and Gipuzkoa provinces; Navarra autonomous region. 468,000 in Spain (European Commission 2012). Population total all countries: 545,872. Ethnic population: 2,000,000 residents of 3 provinces of Basque territory; 25% born outside territory, 40% in territory born to Basque parents. 4,400,000 in Spain have Basque surname; 19% live in Basque country. Status: 2 (Provincial). Statutory provincial language in Basque Country Autonomous Community (1979, Basque Country Autonomous Community Act 3, 1979, Article 6.1). Alternate Names: Euskara, Euskera, Vascuense Dialects: Alavan, Alto Navarro Meridional, Alto Navarro Septentrional (High Navarrese, Upper Navarran), Biscayan (Vizcaino), Gipuzkera (Gipuzkoan, Guipuzcoan, Guipuzcoano), Roncalese. Some inherent intelligibility among regional varieties except Souletin. Regional varieties sometimes preferred for oral use, but strong desire for Batua unified standard. Classification: Language isolate Comments: ‘Euskadi’ is name of Basque region, not the language. Alavan no longer spoken. Christian.

More Information

Caló
[rmq] Scattered. 40,000 in Spain. Population total all countries: 60,000. Status: 5 (Developing). Alternate Names: Gitano, Hispanoromani, Iberian Romani Dialects: Brazilian Calão, Catalonian Caló, Portuguese Calão (Calão, Lusitano-Romani), Spanish Caló. Gypsy language very different from other Romani. A cryptological variety of Spanish [spa] (1995 I. Hancock). McLane found 300 to 400 words based on Romani, but no individual acquainted with more than 100. Regional dialects have Iberian base of Caló, where boundary between Spanish and Portuguese [por] is not distinct. Classification: Mixed language, Iberian-Romani Comments: Movement to revive defunct inflected Spanish Romani; book printed in it (Hancock 1990). Christian.

More Information

Catalan
[cat] Catalonia, Valenciana,Balearic Islands, and Aragon autonomous communities; Carche region, Murcia autonomous community. 3,750,000 in Spain (European Commission 2012). Population total all countries: 4,079,420. L2 users: 5,150,000 in Spain (European Commission 2012). Status: 2 (Provincial). Statutory provincial language in Valencia Autonomous Community (1982, Autonomy Act, No. 9, 1982, Article 7), Valencian in local laws. Statutory provincial language in Aragon Autonomous Community (1982, Autonomy Act, No. 8, 1982, Article 7), LAPAO (Eastern Aragonese) in local laws. Statutory provincial language in Catalonia Autonomous Community (1979, Autonomy Act, No. 4, 1979, Article 3(2,5)). Alternate Names: Català, Catalán, Catalan-Valencian-Balear, Catalonian, Valencian Dialects: Algherese, Balearic (Balear, Eivissenc, Insular Catalan, Mallorqui, Menorqui, Menorquin), Catalan-Rousillonese (Northern Catalan), Central Catalan, Northwestern Catalan (Aiguavivan, Eastern Aragonese, Lleidatà, Pallarese, Ribagorçan), Valencian (Valencià, Valenciano). Standardized variety is a literary composite of several dialects and written form is most similar to Barcelona speech. Pallarese and Ribogorçan dialects less similar to standard Catalan. Benasquese and Aiguavivan people live in isolated valleys and have distinct phonology from their neighbors. Tortosin may be more similar to Valencian. Central Catalan has 90% to 95% inherent intelligibility for speakers of Valencian (1989 R. Hall, Jr.). Lexical similarity: 87% with Italian [ita], 85% with Portuguese [por] and Spanish [spa], 76% with Ladin [lld], 75% with Sardinian [src], 73% with Romanian [ron]. Classification: Indo-European, Italic, Romance, Italo-Western, Western, Gallo-Iberian, Ibero-Romance, East Iberian Comments: Christian.

More Information

Catalan Sign Language
[csc] Scattered in Catalonia. 9,000 (2014). Deaf sign language users, total for all three sign languages in Spain: 60,000–80,000 (2000 Instituto Nacional de Estadística), 100,000 (2014 EUD). Based on these numbers and proportions of total population in various regions in Spain, estimated 9,000–15,000 for LSC. Status: 5 (Developing). Statutory language of provincial identity in Balearic Islands Autonomous Community (1985, Autonomy Act, No. 2, 1985, Article 3(2)). Recognized language (2006, Basic Law No. 6 of 19 July). Alternate Names: Catalonian Sign Language, Lengua de Señas Catalana, Lengua de Signos Catalana, Llengua de Signes Catalana, LSC Dialects: None known. Similar to Spanish Sign Language [ssp] and Valencian Sign Language [vsv]. About 70%–80% intelligibility by users of Spanish Sign Language (2014 S. Parkhurst). Fingerspelling system similar to French Sign Language [fsl]. Classification: Deaf sign language Comments: Many sign language classes for hearing people. Materials for learning as L2. Few parents actually learn to sign. (2014 S. Parkhurst). Christian (Roman Catholic), Christian (Protestant).

More Information

Erromintxela
[emx] Scattered in País Vasco autonomous community. 500 in Spain (2009 J. McLaughlin). Status: 6b (Threatened). Alternate Names: Basque Caló, Caló Vasco Classification: Mixed language, Basque-Romani

More Information

Extremaduran
[ext] Extremadura autonomous community: northwest Caceres province; Castille and Leon autonomous community: southwest Salamanca province. 200,000 in Spain. 500,000 able to use it, including some monolinguals (1994 T. Erickson). Most use northern dialect. Population total all countries: 201,500. Ethnic population: 1,100,000 (1994). Status: 7 (Shifting). Alternate Names: Barranquian, Cahtúo, Cahtúö, Ehtremeñu, Extremeño Dialects: Central Extremaduran (Meyu Ehtremeñu), Northern Extremaduran (Artu Ehtremeñu), Southern Extremaduran (Bahu Ehtremeñu). Related to the eastern dialect of Tur-Leonese. Classification: Indo-European, Italic, Romance, Italo-Western, Western, Gallo-Iberian, Ibero-Romance, West Iberian, Castilian Comments: 2 orthographies, one Castilian-like, developed early 20th century by the famous poet José María Gabriel y Galán; the other more recent and more phonetic.

More Information

Fala
[fax] Extremadura autonomousrRegion: northwest corner, an isolated valley on Portugal border, Val de Xalima and Val du riu Ellas, Valverdi du Fresnu, As Ellas, and Sa Martín de Trebellu towns. 10,500 (1994 T. Erickson). 5,500 in the language area; 5,000 outside, many of whom return each summer. Status: 6a (Vigorous). Alternate Names: A Fala de Xálima, A Fala do Xãlima, “Chapurreáu” (pej.), Galaico-Extremaduran Dialects: Lagarteiru, Mañegu, Valvideiru. Not easily intelligible with surrounding language varieties. Intelligible to speakers of Galician [glg]. Classification: Indo-European, Italic, Romance, Italo-Western, Western, Gallo-Iberian, Ibero-Romance, West Iberian, Portuguese-Galician Comments: Do not identify with Galicians. Do not want orthography to be like Galician.

More Information

Galician
[glg] Galicia and western Asturias autonomous communities; Castille and Leon autonomous community, western Leon and Zamora provinces. 2,340,000 in Spain (European Commission 2012). Population total all countries: 2,355,000. Status: 2 (Provincial). Statutory provincial language in Galicia Autonomous Community (1981, Autonomy Statute, Act 1 of 6 April, Article 5). Alternate Names: Galego, Gallego Dialects: Galician is reportedly between Portuguese [por] and Spanish [spa], but is more similar to Portuguese, which has about 85% intelligibility (1989 R. Hall). Many dialects. Classification: Indo-European, Italic, Romance, Italo-Western, Western, Gallo-Iberian, Ibero-Romance, West Iberian, Portuguese-Galician Comments: Growing sense of ethnic identity.

More Information

Gascon, Aranese
[oci] Catalonia autonomous region: Aran valley, northwest corner, Garona River headwaters, Pyrenees Mountains. 3,810 in Spain (1991 census). Spoken by most of the 4,800 living in the Aran Valley in the Pyrenees (Salminen 2007). Ethnic population: 5,550 (1991). Status: 6b (Threatened). Statutory provincial language in Catalonia (2010, Occitan Act, Autonomous Community of Catalonia Parliament, 22 September), Aranese in local laws. Alternate Names: Aranés, Aranese, Aranese Occitán, Arnais, Gascón Dialects: Baish Aranés, Mijaranés Aranés, Naut Aranés. Classification: Indo-European, Italic, Romance, Italo-Western, Western, Gallo-Iberian, Ibero-Romance, Oc Comments: Called Aranese in France; influenced by Catalan [cat] and Spanish [spa] more than French [fra].

More Information

Quinqui
[quq] Scattered throughout northern Spain. Status: 6a (Vigorous). Classification: Unclassified Comments: Contains elements of Caló [rmq] and Germania argot. Used to be tinsmiths; the name comes from ‘quincalleria’, ironmongery. Ethnonym: mercheros, preferred. Not Rom or Gypsies.

More Information

Spanish
[spa] Widespread. 38,400,000 in Spain (European Commission 2012). Population total all countries: 398,931,840. L2 users: 7,490,000 in Spain (European Commission 2006). L2 users worldwide: 89,500,000. Status: 1 (National). Statutory national language (1978, Constitution, Art 3(1)), recognized statutory language in all autonomous cities and communities under various local laws. Alternate Names: Castellano, Castilian, Español Dialects: American Spanish (Chicano), Andalusian (Andalú, Andalusí, Andaluz), Aragonese, Canary Islands Spanish (Isleño), Castilian, Murcian, Navarrese, Silbo Gomero. Lexical similarity: 89% with Portuguese [por], 85% with Catalan [cat], 82% with Italian [ita], 76% with Sardinian [src], 75% with French [fra], 74% with Ladin [lld], 71% with Romanian [ron]. Classification: Indo-European, Italic, Romance, Italo-Western, Western, Gallo-Iberian, Ibero-Romance, West Iberian, Castilian Comments: The Aragonese dialect of Spanish is different from Aragonese language [arg]. Christian.

More Information

Spanish Sign Language
[ssp] Scattered, except for Catalonia and Valencia. 45,000 (1994). Deaf sign language users, total for all three sign languages in Spain: 60,000–80,000 (2000 Instituto Nacional de Estadística), 100,000 (2014 EUD). Based on these numbers and proportions of total population in various regions in Spain, estimated 45,000–75,000 for LSE. Status: 5 (Developing). Recognized language (2007, Law 27, Official language of deaf community). Alternate Names: Lengua de Señas Española, Lengua de Signos Española, LSE, Mímica Dialects: Significant regional variation but with only minor difficulties in intercommunication. About 70–80% intelligibility by users of Catalan Sign Language [csc] and 80% intelligibility by users of Valencian Sign Language [vsv]. There may have been some early influence from French Sign Language [fsl]. (2014 S. Parkhurst). Fingerspelling system similar to French Sign Language [fsl]. Classification: Deaf sign language Comments: Many sign language classes for hearing people. Materials for learning as L2. Few parents actually learn to sign. (2014 S. Parkhurst). Christian (Roman Catholic), Christian (Protestant).

More Information

Valencian Sign Language
[vsv] Scattered in Valencia. 6,000 (2014). Deaf sign language users, total for all three sign languages in Spain: 60,000–80,000 (2000 Instituto Nacional de Estadística), 100,000 (2014 EUD). Based on these numbers and proportions of total population in various regions in Spain, estimated 6,000–10,000 for LSV. Status: 5 (Developing). Recognized language (2006, Law 1/2006, Autonomy Statute of Valencia, Article 13(4)). Alternate Names: Lengua de Signos Valenciana, Llengua de Signes en la Comunitat Valenciana, Llengua de Signes Valenciana, LSCV, LSV Dialects: None known. Similar to Catalan Sign Language [csc] and Spanish Sign Language [ssp]. Fingerspelling system similar to French Sign Language [fsl]. Classification: Deaf sign language Comments: Many sign language classes for hearing people. Materials for learning as L2. Few parents actually learn to sign. (2014 S. Parkhurst). Christian (Roman Catholic), Christian (Protestant).

More Information