Honduras

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Ch’orti’
[caa] Copán Department, along the Guatemala border. 10 in Honduras (1997 R. Reeck). Status: 8b (Nearly extinct). Classification: Mayan, Yucatecan-Core Mayan, Core Mayan, Cholan-Tzeltalan, Cholan, Chorti-Cholti

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English
[eng] Bay Islands Department (Guanaja, Roatán, Utila), and large cities along north mainland coast. 31,500 in Honduras (2001). 22,500 Bay Islands English speakers on the north coast. Status: 5 (Dispersed). Dialects: Bay Islands English. Classification: Indo-European, Germanic, West, English Comments: Some creole influence.

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Garifuna
[cab] Mainly north coast between Masca, Cortés Department, Plaplaya; Gracias a Dios Department. 37 villages in Honduras, 46 elsewhere in Central America (plus cities La Ceiba, San Pedro Sula, Tegucigalpa, and Puerto Cortés). Also in Belize, Guatemala, Nicaragua, United States. 98,000 in Honduras (Rivas 1993). 100 monolinguals. Population total all countries: 195,800. Status: 5 (Developing). Alternate Names: Black Carib, Caribe, Central American Carib, Garífuna Dialects: Eastern Garifuna, Western Garifuna. Eastern Garifuna dialect is in Honduras and Nicaragua (leaves out, r, and tends to shorten words), Western Garifuna in Guatemala and Belize. Related to Island Carib [car], with Spanish [spa], English [eng], and French [fra] borrowings. Classification: Maipurean, Northern, Maritime, Ta-Maipurean, Iñeri Comments: Christian, traditional religion.

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Honduras Sign Language
[hds] Status: 5 (Developing). Alternate Names: Honduran Sign Language, Lengua de Señas Hondureñas, LESHO Dialects: LESHO (Honduran Sign Language) tends to vary by region. Deaf people along the North coast have some distinct signs from deaf people in the southern part of the country. Classification: Deaf sign language

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Lenca
[len] La Paz, Intibucá, Lempira, Comayagua, Santa Bárbara, Valle and Francisco Morazán departments. No known L1 speakers. Some semi-speakers (Adelaar 2007). Ethnic population: 100,000. Status: 9 (Dormant). Dialects: Some considered it Macro-Chibchan. Classification: Lencan

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Mayangna
[yan] Between the Patuca and Wanki rivers. 700 in Honduras (1997 SIL). Ethnic population: 1,030 (McSweeney 2002). Status: 5 (Developing). Alternate Names: Sumu Dialects: Twahka. Classification: Misumalpan

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Mískito
[miq] Gracias a Dios Department. 29,000 in Honduras (Rivas 1993). Status: 5 (Developing). Alternate Names: Marquito, Mískitu, Mísquito, Mosquito Classification: Misumalpan

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Pech
[pay] North central coast, Olancho Department, Dulce Nombre de Culmí municipality, Santa María del Carbón; Las Marías, Gracias a Dios, Silín, Colón. 990 (Rivas 1993). Ethnic population: 2,590 (Rivas 1993). Status: 8a (Moribund). Alternate Names: Paya, Seco Classification: Chibchan, Chibchan B Comments: Much community interest to preserve the Pech language, and some work is being done to preserve it.

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Spanish
[spa] 7,000,000 in Honduras (2011). Status: 1 (National). Statutory national language (1982, Constitution, Article 6). Alternate Names: Castellano, Español Classification: Indo-European, Italic, Romance, Italo-Western, Western, Gallo-Iberian, Ibero-Romance, West Iberian, Castilian

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Tol
[jic] North-central, northern Francisco Morazán Department, Montaña de la Flor; Yoro. 350 (1997). Ethnic population: 590 (1990 Educación Comunitaria para la Salud-Honduras). Also 19,000 ethnic Tolpan in the Department of Yoro. Status: 5 (Developing). Alternate Names: Jicaque, Tolpan, Xicaque Dialects: No distinct dialects. It may be distantly related to Subtiaba [sut] of Nicaragua (no remaining speakers), Malinaltepec Me’phaa [tcf] of Mexico, or the Hokan languages. Classification: Jicaquean Comments: Christian, traditional religion.

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