Belize

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Belize Kriol English
[bzj] Widespread, including communities on Ambergris and Caulker cayes. 130,000 in Belize (2014 UNSD). Total users in all countries: 170,000. Status: 3 (Wider communication). Lingua franca in much of the country. Alternate Names: Kriol, Miskito Coast Creole English, Western Caribbean Creole. Dialects: None known. Reportedly similar to Nicaragua Creole English [bzk] and Islander (San Andrés) [icr] creoles. Historically an extension of Nicaragua Creole English. There is a spectrum of varieties from standard American English usage to creole. Classification: Creole, English based, Atlantic, Western.

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English
[eng] Widespread. 184,000 in Belize (2014 UNSD). L2 users: 56,000 in Belize (Crystal 2003a). Status: 1 (National). De facto national language. Classification: Indo-European, Germanic, West, English. Comments: Non-indigenous. When Creole languages exist alongside their lexifier language, as in Belize, a continuum forms of variations between the Creole and the lexifier language It is therefore difficult to substantiate the number of Creole speakers and English speakers.

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Garifuna
[cab] Belize, Stann Creek, and Toledo districts: 6 villages. 8,440 in Belize (2014 UNSD). Ethnic population: 15,000 (2013 census). Status: 6b (Threatened). Alternate Names: “Black Carib” (pej.), Caribe, Central American Carib, “Moreno” (pej.). Classification: Maipurean, Northern, Maritime, Ta-Maipurean, Iñeri. Comments: Ancestors taken from Saint Vincent Island in 1796–1797, and taken to Roatan Island. Most went to Trujillo, Honduras in 1937. About 35 years later political troubles threatened their existence, and they fled further east into Honduras and Belize. Later they emigrated to other countries.

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Kekchí
[kek] Southwest corner, inland following east slopes, Maya Mountains, Toledo and Stann Creek districts; also in Cayo District, Belmopan area. 17,600 in Belize (2014 UNSD). Status: 6a (Vigorous). Alternate Names: Cacché, Ketchi, Quecchí. Classification: Mayan, Yucatecan-Core Mayan, K’ichean-Mamean, K’ichean.

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Maya, Mopán
[mop] Cayo, Stann Creek, and Toledo districts: highlands. 10,600 in Belize (2014 UNSD). Total users in all countries: 15,600. Status: 5 (Developing). Alternate Names: Maya Mopán, Mopan, Mopane. Classification: Mayan, Yucatecan-Core Mayan, Yucatecan, Mopan-Itzá.

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Maya, Yucatec
[yua] Cayo district: San Antonio and Succoths; possibly also Corozal and Orange Walk districts near the Mexico border. 2,520 in Belize (2014 UNSD). Status: 6b (Threatened). Alternate Names: Maaya, Maaya t’aan, Maayáa, Maya, Yucantán Maya, Yucateco. Classification: Mayan, Yucatecan-Core Mayan, Yucatecan, Yucatec-Lacandon.

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Plautdietsch
[pdt] Cayo and Orange Walk districts: inland. 9,360 in Belize (2014 UNSD). Status: 6a (Vigorous). Alternate Names: German, Mennonite German. Classification: Indo-European, Germanic, West, Low Saxon-Low Franconian, Low Saxon. Comments: Non-indigenous. Christian.

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Spanish
[spa] Corozal, Orange Walk, and Cayo districts. 174,000 in Belize (Instituto Cervantes 2012). L2 users: 22,000 in Belize (Instituto Cervantes 2012). Status: 3 (Wider communication). Alternate Names: Castellano, Español. Classification: Indo-European, Italic, Romance, Italo-Western, Western, Gallo-Iberian, Ibero-Romance, West Iberian, Castilian. Comments: Non-indigenous.

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