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Alsatian
[gsw] Grand-Est region: south and west bank of Rhine river. Population: 900,000 in France (2013). Status: 6a (Vigorous). Recognized language (2013, No. 595), Education. Alternate Names: Alemannic, Alemannisch, Alsacien, Elsaessisch. Classification: Indo-European, Germanic, West, High German, German, Upper German, Alemannic.

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Armenian, Western
[hyw] Major cities. Population: 70,000 in France (2015 J. Leclerc). Status: 5* (Dispersed). Classification: Indo-European, Armenian.

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Arpitan
[frp] Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes region: Ain, north and central Isere, Loire, Rhone, and Savoy departments; Bourgogne-Franche-Comté region: Doubs, Haute-Alpes, south Jura, and Saone-et-Loire departments; Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur region: border area. Population: 150,000 in France (2013). Total users in all countries: 227,000. Status: 8b (Nearly extinct). Recognized language (2013, Law No. 595), Education. Alternate Names: Franco-provençal, Patois. Dialects: Dauphinois, Lyonnais, Neuchatelais, Savoyard. Structurally distinct from French, Piedmontese [pms], and Lombard [lmo] (1985 F. Agard). In Switzerland, every canton has its own dialect, with no standardization. Difficult intelligibility among dialects, especially Fribourg. Classification: Indo-European, Italic, Romance, Italo-Western, Western, Gallo-Iberian, Gallo-Romance, Gallo-Rhaetian, Oïl, Southeastern.

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Basque
[eus] Nouvelle-Aquitaine region: Pyrenees Atlantiques province, Labourd (Lapurdi) and Basse-Navarre departments, Bayonne and Soule areas; border with Spain. Population: 72,000 in France (2013). Ethnic population: 730,000 (Johnstone 1993). Status: 7 (Shifting). Recognized language (2013, No. 595), Education. Alternate Names: Euskara. Dialects: Navarrese-Labourtan (Bajo Navarro Occidental, Bajo Navarro Oriental, Benaffarera, Eastern Low Navarrese, Labourdin, Lapurdiera, Nafar-lapurtera, Navarro-Labourdin, Western Low Navarrese), Souletin (Souletino, Suberoan, Suletino, Xiberoera, Zuberera, Zuberoera). Classification: Language isolate.

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Breton
[bre] Brittany region: Finistere, western Cotes-d’Armor, and western Morbihan departments; elsewhere dispersed. Population: 206,000 (2013 R. Milin), decreasing. Status: 8a (Moribund). Recognized language (2013, No. 595), Education. Alternate Names: Berton. Autonym: Brezhoneg. Dialects: Leoneg (Leonais), Tregerieg (Tregorrois), Gwenedeg (Vannetais), Kerneveg (Cornouaillais). Classification: Indo-European, Celtic, Insular, Brythonic.

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Caló
[rmq] Occitania region. Population: 15,000 in France. Status: 5* (Developing). Alternate Names: Gitano, Iberian Romani. Dialects: Catalonian Caló, Spanish Caló. Classification: Mixed language, Iberian-Romani.

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Catalan
[cat] Occitania region: Pyrenees-Orientales department. Population: 126,000 in France (2013). Status: 5 (Dispersed). Recognized language (2013, No. 595), education. Alternate Names: Català. Classification: Indo-European, Italic, Romance, Italo-Western, Western, Gallo-Iberian, Ibero-Romance, East Iberian.

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Corsican
[cos] Corsica region; possibly in Marseilles, Paris, other urban centers. Population: 150,000 in France (2013), decreasing. Ethnic population: 315,000 (2017). Total users in all countries: 151,000. Status: 4 (Educational). Statutory language of provincial identity in Corsica (2002, Act. No. 2002-92 (22 Jan) on Corsica, Article 7), mainly used in education. Alternate Names: Corse, Corsi, Corso. Autonym: Corsu. Dialects: Sartenais, Vico-Ajaccio, Northern Corsican (Bastia, Cape Cors), Venaco. Lexical similarity: 79%–89% with Bastia, Venaco, Vico, and Sartene dialects. Bonifacio on the southern tip of the island has 78% lexical similarity (highest) with Bastia at extreme north. Ajaccio dialect is central and prestigious. Classification: Indo-European, Italic, Romance, Southern, Corsican.

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Erromintxela
[emx] Nouvelle-Aquitaine region. Population: 500 in France (2009 J. McLaughlin). Total users in all countries: 1,000. Status: 8a (Moribund). Alternate Names: Basque Caló, Caló Vasco. Classification: Mixed language, Basque-Romani.

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French
[fra] Population: 63,260,000 in France, all users. L1 users: 60,400,000 in France (European Commission 2012). L2 users: 2,860,000 (2016). Total users in all countries: 279,821,930 (as L1: 77,177,210; as L2: 202,644,720). Status: 1 (National). Statutory national language (1958, Constitution, Article 2.1). Autonym: français. Dialects: Standard French, Norman (Normand), Angevin, Berrichon, Bourbonnais, Bourguignon, Franc-Comtois, Gallo, Poitevin, Lorraine, Saintongeais. Lexical similarity: 89% with Italian [ita], 80% with Logudorese Sardinian [src], 78% with Romansh [roh], 75% with Portuguese [por], Romanian [ron], and Spanish[spa], 29% with German [deu], 27% with English [eng]. Classification: Indo-European, Italic, Romance, Italo-Western, Western, Gallo-Iberian, Gallo-Romance, Gallo-Rhaetian, Oïl, French.

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French Sign Language
[fsl] Scattered. Population: 100,000 in France (2019 Fédération Nationale des Sourds de France). Other estimates: 300,000 (2019 EUD), 169,000 (2014 IMB). Of these, approximately 1,000 use Marseille Sign Language (Sallagoity 1975). Status: 5 (Developing). Recognized language (2005, Code de l’éducation, Partie législative, Deuxième partie, Livre III, Titre 1er, Chapitre II, Article L312-9-1, Section 3 bis), Recognized as a complete language for use in education. Alternate Names: LSF, Langue des signes française. Dialects: Marseille Sign Language (Southern French Sign Language). Marseille Sign Language (Southern French Sign Language), is used in Marseille, Toulon, La Ciotat and Salon de Provence. Many sign languages have been derived from or influenced by LSF, but are not necessarily intelligible with it. When Deaf and hearing people interact in sign, they use a mixture of elements drawn from LSF and French, and Deaf people themselves vary in how much their signing is influenced by French. Lexical similarity: 58% with American Sign Language [ase] in an 872-word list (Woodward 1978a). Classification: Sign language.

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Italian
[ita] Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes and Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur regions: Nice, Provence, and Savoy. Population: 829,000 in France (2008 census). Status: 5* (Dispersed). Alternate Names: Italiano, Italien. Classification: Indo-European, Italic, Romance, Italo-Western, Italo-Dalmatian.

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Ligurian
[lij] Corsica region: Bonifacio town; Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur region: between Italy and Monaco borders. Population: 300–400 in Corsica (Salminen 2007). Status: 8a (Moribund). Recognized language (2013, No. 595), Education. Alternate Names: Ligure. Dialects: Genoese (Genoan, Genovese). Classification: Indo-European, Italic, Romance, Italo-Western, Western, Gallo-Iberian, Gallo-Romance, Gallo-Italian.

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Lorraine Franconian
[pfl] Grand-Est region: Lorraine, north and east. Population: 400,000 in France (2013). Status: 6a* (Vigorous). Recognized language (2013, No. 595), Education. Alternate Names: Francique, Lottrìnger Plàtt, Plàtt. Classification: Indo-European, Germanic, West, High German, German, Middle German, West Middle German.

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Luxembourgish
[ltz] Grand-Est region: Moselle river area, Germany border to Luxembourg, Thionville. Population: 40,000 in France (2001 J. Nousse). Status: 5* (Dispersed). Recognized language (2013, No. 595), Education. Alternate Names: Frankish, Luxembourgeois, Platt. Dialects: Miseler, Minetter. Classification: Indo-European, Germanic, West, High German, German, Middle German, West Middle German, Moselle Franconian.

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Norman French
[nrf] Normandy: Manche department (Cotentinais dialect); Calvados and Orne departments (Augeron dialect); Seine-Maritime department (Cauchois dialect). Population: 17,000 in France (2015 M. Jones). Status: 6a* (Vigorous). Alternate Names: Normand, Normaund. Dialects: Cotentinais, Cauchois, Augeron. Classification: Indo-European, Italic, Romance, Italo-Western, Western, Gallo-Iberian, Gallo-Romance, Gallo-Rhaetian, Oïl, French.

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Occitan
[oci] Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes region: Ardeche, Cantal, Drome, Haute-Loire, Isere, Loire, and Puy-de-Dome departments; Nouvelle-Aquitaine region: Charentes, Correze, and Haute-Vienne departments; Occitania region: all except Pyrenees-Orientales department; Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur region. Population: 110,000 in France (Bernissan 2012). Total users in all countries: 218,310. Status: 6b (Threatened). Recognized language (2013, No. 595), Education. Alternate Names: Occitani. Dialects: Auvergnat (Auverne, Auvernhas, Auvernhe), Gascon, Languedocien (Langadoc, Languedoc, Lengadoucian), Limousin (Lemosin), Provençal (Alpine Provençal, Mistralien, Prouvençau, Provençau), Vivaro-alpine, Niçard (Niçois). Highly fragmented dialect situation, with limited intelligibility between some varieties. Classification: Indo-European, Italic, Romance, Italo-Western, Western, Gallo-Iberian, Ibero-Romance, Oc.

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Picard
[pcd] Hauts-de-France region: Abbeville, Amiens, Arras, Beauvais, Boulogne sur Mer, Calais (except Dunkerque district), Cambrai, Douai, Lille, Saint Quentin, and Valenciennes; Normandy region: near Dieppe, Picardie border. Population: 500,000 in France (Auger 2011). Total users in all countries: 700,000. Status: 8b (Nearly extinct). Recognized language (2013, No. 595), Education. Alternate Names: Chtimi, Rouchi. Dialects: Ponthieu, Vimeu, Hainaut, Artois, Lillois, Boulonnais, Santerre, Calaisis, Cambresis, Vermandois, Amienois (Amies). All dialects, including those in Belgium, are mutually inherently intelligible. Classification: Indo-European, Italic, Romance, Italo-Western, Western, Gallo-Iberian, Gallo-Romance, Gallo-Rhaetian, Oïl, French.

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Portuguese
[por] Scattered. Corsica region; Hauts-de-France region: Roubaix, near Belgian border; Île-de-France region: Paris; Nouvelle-Aquitaine region: Bordeaux; Occitania region: Toulouse. Population: 959,000 in France (2008 census). Status: 5* (Dispersed). Alternate Names: Portugais, Português. Classification: Indo-European, Italic, Romance, Italo-Western, Western, Gallo-Iberian, Ibero-Romance, West Iberian, Portuguese-Galician.

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Romani, Sinte
[rmo] Scattered. Population: 28,400 in France (2000). Status: 5* (Dispersed). Alternate Names: Romanes, Sinte, Sinti, Tsigane. Dialects: Manouche (Manuche, Manush). Classification: Indo-European, Indo-Iranian, Indo-Aryan, Intermediate Divisions, Western, Romani, Northern.

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Shuadit
[sdt] Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur region: Avignon area. Population: No known L1 speakers. Last known speaker, Armand Lunel, died in 1977. Status: 10 (Extinct). Alternate Names: Judeo-Comtadine, Judeo-Provençal, Shuadi. Classification: Indo-European, Italic, Romance, Italo-Western, Western, Gallo-Iberian, Ibero-Romance, Oc.

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Spanish
[spa] Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes region: Lyon; Île-de-France region: Paris; Nouvelle-Aquitaine region: Bordeaux; Occitania region: Toulouse; Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur region: Marseilles and Nice. Population: 6,246,000 in France, all users. L1 users: 446,000 in France (2016). L2 users: 5,800,000 (2016). Status: 5* (Dispersed). Alternate Names: Castillan, Espagnol, Español. Classification: Indo-European, Italic, Romance, Italo-Western, Western, Gallo-Iberian, Ibero-Romance, West Iberian, Castilian.

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Vlaams
[vls] Hauts-de-France region: Dunkerque area and southeast to Belgium border. Population: 30,000 in France (2013). Status: 8a (Moribund). Recognized language (2013, No. 595), Education. Alternate Names: Flamand, Frans Vlaams, Vlaemsch, Vlamingen. Classification: Indo-European, Germanic, West, Low Saxon-Low Franconian, Low Franconian.

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