Croatia

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Bosnian
[bos] 16,900 in Croatia (2014 UNSD). Status: 5 (Dispersed). Dialects: Ijekavían, Ikavian. Classification: Indo-European, Balto-Slavic, Slavic, South, Western. Comments: Non-indigenous. Influences from Turkish [tur] and Arabic [arb].

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Croatia Sign Language
[csq] Scattered. 12,000 (2010 Croatian Association of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing). 12,000 signers out of 20,000 deaf (2010 Croatian Association of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing). 13,000 (2014 Union of Deaf of Zagreb). 17,500 (2014 IMB). Status: 5 (Developing). Alternate Names: CSL, Hrvatski znakovni jezik, HZJ. Dialects: Origin from deaf schools in Austria and Hungary. In the past, regarded as a dialect of Yugoslavian Sign Language [ysl] (Bickford 2005); further research needed. One-handed fingerspelling system is similar to French Sign Language [fsl]. Classification: Sign language. Comments: L2 teaching materials, including for medical personnel. The first school for the deaf in Croatia was formed in Zagreb in 1885. 52 interpreters (2014 Union of Deaf of Zagreb). HZJ is recognized by the government and a law to provide educational protection and assistance is before Parliament (2014). L2 teaching materials, including for medical personnel. Christian.

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Croatian
[hrv] 4,200,000 in Croatia (European Commission 2006). Total users in all countries: 6,861,590 (as L1: 5,611,590; as L2: 1,250,000). Status: 1 (National). Statutory national language (1990, Constitution, Article 12.1). Alternate Names: Hrvatski. Dialects: Kaykavski, Chakavski, Shtokavski (Ijekavski). Shtokavski is official dialect, but others recognized as valid, with much literature. Chakavski in western and northern Croatia, Dalmatian coast, and Adriatic Islands; Kaykavski in northeastern Croatia and Zagreb; dialects in other countries, like Burgenland Croatian in Austria, less intelligible. A member of macrolanguage Serbo-Croatian [hbs]. Classification: Indo-European, Balto-Slavic, Slavic, South, Western. Comments: Formerly considered part of the Serbo-Croat language. Christian.

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Czech
[ces] 6,290 in Croatia (2014 UNSD). Status: 5 (Dispersed). Alternate Names: Ceský jazyk, Cestina. Classification: Indo-European, Balto-Slavic, Slavic, West, Czech-Slovak. Comments: Non-indigenous.

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Hungarian
[hun] 10,200 in Croatia (2014 UNSD). Status: 5 (Dispersed). Classification: Uralic. Comments: Non-indigenous.

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Istriot
[ist] Istarska County, Istrian peninsula, west coast; Rovinj and Vodnjan towns. 400 (Salminen 2007). L2 users: 900 (Salminen 2007). Status: 7 (Shifting). Alternate Names: Istro-Romance. Dialects: None known. An archaic Romance language, often confused with Istro Romanian [ruo]. Perhaps more similar to Friulian [fur] or Dalmatian than to Istro Romanian. Classification: Indo-European, Italic, Romance, Italo-Western, Italo-Dalmatian.

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Italian
[ita] Istarska County, northwest areas near Slovenia border, along west coast, Istrian peninsula. 18,600 in Croatia (2014 UNSD). L2 users: 600,000 in Croatia (European Commission 2006). Ethnic population: 30,000 (1998). Status: 2 (Provincial). Statutory provincial language in Istria County (2003, Istrian Regional Statute, Article 6), per Italian bilateral treaty 1996. Classification: Indo-European, Italic, Romance, Italo-Western, Italo-Dalmatian. Comments: Non-indigenous.

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Romani, Sinte
[rmo] 14,400 in Croatia (2014 UNSD). Status: 5 (Dispersed). Alternate Names: Romanes. Classification: Indo-European, Indo-Iranian, Indo-Aryan, Intermediate Divisions, Western, Romani, Northern. Comments: Non-indigenous.

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Romanian, Istro
[ruo] Primorsko-Goranska County, Istrian peninsula, Žejane village, south towards northern reaches of Kvarner gulf. 300 (Salminen 2007). L2 users: 1,100 (Salminen 2007). Status: 7 (Shifting). Alternate Names: Istrio-Romanian, Istro-Romanian. Dialects: None known. Structurally distinct from Romanian [ron] (Agard 1984). Split from the other 3 Romanian languages between 500 and 1000 A.D. Different from Istriot [ist]. Classification: Indo-European, Italic, Romance, Eastern.

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Rusyn
[rue] 1,470 in Croatia (2014 UNSD). Status: 6a (Vigorous). Alternate Names: Carpathian, Carpatho-Rusyn, Ruthenian. Classification: Indo-European, Balto-Slavic, Slavic, East. Comments: Non-indigenous.

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Serbian
[srp] 61,600 in Croatia (2014 UNSD). Status: 5 (Dispersed). Classification: Indo-European, Balto-Slavic, Slavic, South, Western. Comments: Non-indigenous. Muslim.

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Slovak
[slk] 3,790 in Croatia (2014 UNSD). Status: 5 (Dispersed). Alternate Names: Slovencina, Slovenský Jazyk. Classification: Indo-European, Balto-Slavic, Slavic, West, Czech-Slovak. Comments: Non-indigenous.

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Slovene
[slv] Istarska and Primorsko-Goranska counties, scattered; also in urban areas, Rijeka and Zagreb. 9,220 in Croatia (2014 UNSD). Status: 5 (Dispersed). Alternate Names: Slovenian. Classification: Indo-European, Balto-Slavic, Slavic, South, Western. Comments: Non-indigenous.

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Ukrainian
[ukr] 1,010 in Croatia (2014 UNSD). Status: 5 (Dispersed). Classification: Indo-European, Balto-Slavic, Slavic, East. Comments: Non-indigenous.

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Venetian
[vec] Istarska and Splitsko-Dalmatinska counties: most of Istria peninsula, Fiume-Rijeka city, some cities in Kvarner and coastal Dalmatia. 50,000 in Croatia (1994 T. Salminen). Status: 5 (Developing). Alternate Names: Veneto. Dialects: Istrian, Tretine, Venetian Proper. Classification: Indo-European, Italic, Romance, Italo-Western, Western, Gallo-Iberian, Gallo-Romance, Gallo-Italian. Comments: Non-indigenous.

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