Jordan

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Adyghe
[ady] Major cities. Population: 68,400 in Jordan (2015). Status: 5* (Dispersed). Alternate Names: Adygey, West Circassian. Classification: Abkhaz-Adyghe, Circassian.

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Arabic, Levantine Bedawi Spoken
[avl] Widespread but especially east. Population: 1,040,000 in Jordan (2016). Status: 6a* (Vigorous). Dialects: South Levantine Bedawi Arabic, North Levantine Bedawi Arabic, Eastern Egyptian Bedawi Arabic. Classification: Afro-Asiatic, Semitic, Central, South, Arabic.

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Arabic, Najdi Spoken
[ars] Al ‘Aqabah, Al Mafraq, Az-Zarqa’, and southeast Ma‘an governorates; scattered settlements far eastern Jordan. Population: 76,000 in Jordan (2015). Status: 6a* (Vigorous). Alternate Names: Najdi. Classification: Afro-Asiatic, Semitic, Central, South, Arabic.

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Arabic, North Mesopotamian Spoken
[ayp] Scattered. Population: 304,000 in Jordan (2015). Status: 6a* (Vigorous). Classification: Afro-Asiatic, Semitic, Central, South, Arabic.

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Arabic, South Levantine Spoken
[ajp] ‘Ajlun, Al Balqa’, Al Karak, Al Mafraq, ‘Amman, Irbid, Jarash, and Madaba governorates. Population: 5,200,000 in Jordan (2016). Total users in all countries: 11,601,100. Status: 3 (Wider communication). De facto national working language. Alternate Names: Levantine Arabic, Palestinian-Jordanian, South Levantine Arabic. Autonym: أردني‎ (Urduni). Dialects: Madani, Fellahi. There is a village-to-village difference of which speakers are aware. Newly emerging urban standard dialect based on Amman. A member of macrolanguage Arabic [ara]. Classification: Afro-Asiatic, Semitic, Central, South, Arabic.

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Arabic, Standard
[arb] Widespread. Population: 5,770,000 in Jordan (2015 SIL), all users. Status: 1 (National). Statutory national language (1952, Constitution, Article 2). Classification: Afro-Asiatic, Semitic, Central, South, Arabic.

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Armenian, Western
[hyw] Widespread. Population: 7,600 in Jordan (2015). Status: 7 (Shifting). Classification: Indo-European, Armenian.

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Chechen
[che] Al Mafraq and Az-Zarqa’ governorates; scattered communities north of Amman. Population: 3,800 in Jordan (2015). Status: 5* (Dispersed). Alternate Names: Nokhchi. Classification: Nakh-Daghestanian, Nakh, Chechen-Ingush.

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Domari
[rmt] ‘Amman governorate and Iraqi-Jordan border area (Al Mafraq governorate). Population: Ethnic population: 4,910 (2000). Status: 6b* (Threatened). Alternate Names: Barake, Dom, Gypsy, Kurbat, Middle Eastern Romani, Nawar, Tsigene. Dialects: Nawar (Nawari), Kurbat (Ghorbati), Barake. Classification: Indo-European, Indo-Iranian, Indo-Aryan, Intermediate Divisions, Western, Dom.

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Jordanian Sign Language
[jos] Scattered. Population: Status: 5 (Developing). Alternate Names: LIU, Lughat il-Ishaarah il-Urduniyyah. Dialects: None known. LIU signers understand Egyptian Sign Language (LIM) [esl] to some extent, despite lexical differences. Not the same as Unified Arabic Sign Language, an artificial system promoted by representatives of 18 Arabic-speaking countries (Rashdan 2016). Relatively low lexical similarity with Egyptian Sign Language (LIM) [esl] (Hendriks 2008). Classification: Sign language.

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Kabardian
[kbd] ‘Amman, Az-Zarqa’, and Jarash governorates; Russeifa and Sweileh urban areas near the capital. Population: 113,000 in Jordan (2016). Status: 6b* (Threatened). Classification: Abkhaz-Adyghe, Circassian.

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