Poland

Print
Armenian, Western
[hyw] Major cities. Population: 2,210 in Poland (2013 UNSD). Status: 4 (Educational). Recognized language (2005, Minorities Act of 2 January, Article 2(2)). Classification: Indo-European, Armenian.

More Information

Belarusian
[bel] Podlaskie province. Population: 26,700 in Poland (2013 UNSD). Status: 5* (Dispersed). Recognized language (2005, Minorities Act of 2 January, Article 2(2)). Alternate Names: Belarusan, Byelorussian, White Russian. Dialects: Podlachian (Pudlaśka mova). Classification: Indo-European, Balto-Slavic, Slavic, East.

More Information

Czech
[ces] Łódź province: Bełchatów county, Zelów; Lower Silesia province: Kłodzko county; Masovia province: Warsaw; Silesia province: Cieszyn county. Population: 1,430 in Poland (2013 UNSD). Status: 5* (Dispersed). Recognized language (2005, Minorities Act of 2 January, Article 2(2)). Alternate Names: Čeština, Český jazyk. Classification: Indo-European, Balto-Slavic, Slavic, West, Czech-Slovak.

More Information

English
[eng] Population: 12,780,900 in Poland, all users. L1 users: 80,900 in Poland (2013 UNSD). L2 users: 12,700,000 (European Commission 2012). Status: 4 (Educational). Alternate Names: Język angielski. Classification: Indo-European, Germanic, West, English.

More Information

Esperanto
[epo] Scattered internationally. Most widely represented in Japan, China, France, Germany, Italy, Poland, United States, Brazil, Belgium, and United Kingdom (in order of number of members in the World Esperanto Association). Population: 2,001,000, all users. L1 users: 1,000 (Corsetti et al 2004), increasing. L2 users: 2,000,000 (Wandel 2015). Status: 3 (Wider communication). Esperanto was developed for intercommunication among L1 users of other languages. It is currently used by speakers in over 100 countries of the world. Autonym: Esperanto, Lingvo Internacia. Classification: Constructed language.

More Information

German, Standard
[deu] Lower Silesia, Opole, and Silesia provinces. Population: 7,363,600 in Poland, all users. L1 users: 63,600 in Poland (2013 UNSD). L2 users: 7,300,000 (European Commission 2012). Status: 2 (Provincial). Statutory provincial language in Opolskie and Silesian provinces (2005, Minorities Act of 2 January, Articles 2(2), 9). Alternate Names: Deutsch, Niemiec. Classification: Indo-European, Germanic, West, High German, German, Middle German, East Middle German.

More Information

Kashubian
[csb] Pomerania province: near Baltic coast, lower Vistula left bank; west of Gdansk bay; narrow strip inland, southwest from Gdynia. Population: 107,000 in Poland (2013 UNSD). Ethnic population: 233,000 (2011). Total users in all countries: 117,000 (as L1: 107,000; as L2: 10,000). Status: 6b (Threatened). Recognized language (2005, Minorities Act of 2 January, Article 19). Alternate Names: Cashubian, Cassubian, Kaszubski. Autonym: Kaszëbsczi jãzëk. Dialects: Kashubian Proper, Slovincian. German [deu] influences in the language. Transitional dialects between Kashubian Proper, the Slovincian dialect, and Polish [pol]. Classification: Indo-European, Balto-Slavic, Slavic, West, Lechitic.

More Information

Lithuanian
[lit] Podlaskie province: scattered. Population: 5,050 in Poland (2013 UNSD). Status: 2 (Provincial). Statutory provincial language in Podlaskie Province (2005, Minorities Act of 2 January, Article 2(2)). Alternate Names: Lietuviškai, Lietuvių kalba, Litewski. Classification: Indo-European, Balto-Slavic, Baltic, Eastern.

More Information

Polish
[pol] Widespread. Population: 36,711,000 in Poland, all users. L1 users: 36,500,000 in Poland (European Commission 2012). L2 users: 211,000 (European Commission 2012). Total users in all countries: 40,378,030 (as L1: 39,713,030; as L2: 665,000). Status: 1 (National). Statutory national language (1997, Constitution, Article 27). Alternate Names: Polnisch. Autonym: język polski‎. Dialects: Upper Silesian, Masurian (Mazurian, Mazurski). Classification: Indo-European, Balto-Slavic, Slavic, West, Lechitic.

More Information

Polish Sign Language
[pso] Scattered. Population: 38,000 (2014 IMB). 50,000 signers (2014 EUD). Status: 5 (Developing). Alternate Names: PJM, Polski Język Migowy. Dialects: Various regional dialects. Classification: Sign language.

More Information

Prussian
[prg] Warmia-Masuria province. Population: 50, all users. L1 users: No known L1 speakers. The last L1 speaker died in the early 18th century. L2 users: 50. Status: 9 (Dormant). Alternate Names: Old Prussian. Dialects: None known. Other extinct Baltic languages are: Selonian, Yotvingian, Semigallian, Curonian. Classification: Indo-European, Balto-Slavic, Baltic, Western.

More Information

Romani, Baltic
[rml] Łódź, Lubusz, and Warmia-Masuria provinces. Population: 13,600 in Poland (2013 UNSD). Total users in all countries: 35,310. Status: 5* (Developing). Recognized language (2005, Minorities Act of 2 January, Article 2(4)). Alternate Names: Balt Romani, Balt Slavic Romani, Baltic Slavic Romani, Roma. Autonym: Romani. Dialects: Xaladytko (Xaladitka, Xaladytka), Polish Romani (Polska Roma). A member of macrolanguage Romany [rom]. Classification: Indo-European, Indo-Iranian, Indo-Aryan, Intermediate Divisions, Western, Romani, Northern.

More Information

Romani, Carpathian
[rmc] Scattered, Lesser Poland, Silesian, and Subcarpathian provinces: border with Ukraine (historical Galicia); one dialect in south Poland border region with Hungary. Population: Status: 5* (Developing). Alternate Names: South Polish Romani. Dialects: Bergitka. Classification: Indo-European, Indo-Iranian, Indo-Aryan, Intermediate Divisions, Western, Romani, Northern.

More Information

Romani, Sinte
[rmo] Scattered. Population: Status: 5* (Dispersed). Alternate Names: Romanes, Sinte, Sinti, Tsigane. Dialects: Manuche (Manouche). Classification: Indo-European, Indo-Iranian, Indo-Aryan, Intermediate Divisions, Western, Romani, Northern.

More Information

Romani, Vlax
[rmy] Scattered. Population: 5,000 in Poland. Status: 5* (Developing). Alternate Names: Rom. Dialects: Lovari (Polish Lovari). Classification: Indo-European, Indo-Iranian, Indo-Aryan, Intermediate Divisions, Western, Romani, Vlax.

More Information

Russian
[rus] Scattered. Population: 6,941,900 in Poland, all users. L1 users: 21,900 in Poland (2013 UNSD). L2 users: 6,920,000 (European Commission 2012). Status: 5* (Dispersed). Recognized language (2005, Minorities Act of 2 January, Article 2(2)). Alternate Names: Rosyjski. Classification: Indo-European, Balto-Slavic, Slavic, East.

More Information

Rusyn
[rue] Subcarpathian province: Lemko area, scattered along Slovak border. Population: 6,180 in Poland (2013 UNSD). Ethnic population: 11,000 (2011 census). Status: 6a* (Vigorous). Recognized language (2005, Minorities Act of 2 January, Article 2(4)). Alternate Names: Lemko. Dialects: Lemko. Classification: Indo-European, Balto-Slavic, Slavic, East.

More Information

Silesian
[szl] Silesia province: scattered. Population: 522,000 (2013 UNSD). Status: 6a* (Vigorous). Alternate Names: Slonska Godka, Szlonzokian, ślōnskŏ gŏdka. Autonym: ślůnsko godka. Classification: Indo-European, Balto-Slavic, Slavic, West, Lechitic.

More Information

Silesian, Lower
[sli] Lower Silesia province: scattered. Population: 12,000 in Poland. Total users in all countries: 22,900. Status: 6a* (Vigorous). Alternate Names: Upper Schlesisch. Classification: Indo-European, Germanic, West, High German, German, Middle German, East Middle German.

More Information

Ukrainian
[ukr] Major cities. Population: 26,400 in Poland (2013 UNSD). Status: 5* (Dispersed). Recognized language (2005, Minorities Act of 2 January, Article 2(2)). Alternate Names: Ukraiński. Classification: Indo-European, Balto-Slavic, Slavic, East.

More Information

Wymysorys
[wym] Silesia province: Bielsko county, Wilamowice village. Population: 70 (2006). Status: 8a (Moribund). Alternate Names: Wilamowicean. Dialects: None known. Wymysorys appears to derive from 12th century Middle High German, with strong influences from Low German, Dutch, Frisian, Polish, and Old English. Classification: Indo-European, Germanic, West, High German, German, Middle German, East Middle German.

More Information

Yiddish, Eastern
[ydd] Major cities. Population: 37 in Poland (2002 census). Status: 8b (Nearly extinct). Recognized language (2005, Minorities Act of 2 January, Article 2(2)). Dialects: Northeastern Yiddish (Litvish), Mideastern Yiddish (Polish Yiddish). Classification: Indo-European, Germanic, West, High German, Yiddish.

More Information

Page Views Left: