Portugal

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Asturian
[ast] Bragança district: Miranda do Douro and Vimioso municipalities, 2 towns. Population: 10,000 in Portugal (Salminen 2007). Status: 6b* (Threatened). Alternate Names: Asturian-Leonese, Asturianu. Dialects: West Asturian, Central Asturian (Bable). Classification: Indo-European, Italic, Romance, Italo-Western, Western, Gallo-Iberian, Ibero-Romance, West Iberian, Asturo-Leonese.

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Barranquian
[ext] Beja district: Barrancos municipality. Population: 1,500 in Portugal. Status: 6b* (Threatened). Alternate Names: Barranquenho, Barranquênhu, Cahtúo, Cahtúö, Ehtremeñu, Extremaduran, Extremeño. Classification: Indo-European, Italic, Romance, Italo-Western, Western, Gallo-Iberian, Ibero-Romance, West Iberian, Castilian.

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Caló
[rmq] Scattered. Population: 5,000 in Portugal. Status: 5* (Developing). Alternate Names: Calão, Gitano, Iberian Romani. Dialects: Spanish Caló, Portuguese Calão, Catalonian Caló, Brazilian Calão. Classification: Mixed language, Iberian-Romani.

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English
[eng] Population: 2,851,900 in Portugal, all users. L1 users: 31,900 in Portugal (2007 J. Leclerc). L2 users: 2,820,000 (European Commission 2012). Status: 4 (Educational). Alternate Names: Inglês. Classification: Indo-European, Germanic, West, English.

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Galician
[glg] Bragança and Vila Real districts: northern portions. Population: 15,000 in Portugal (1994 SIL). Status: 5* (Dispersed). Alternate Names: Galego, Gallego. Dialects: Rionorese (Rionorês), Guadramilese (Guadramilês). Classification: Indo-European, Italic, Romance, Italo-Western, Western, Gallo-Iberian, Ibero-Romance, West Iberian, Portuguese-Galician.

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Kabuverdianu
[kea] Primarily in the neighborhoods on the outskirts of Lisbon. Population: 63,900 in Portugal (2007 J. Leclerc), increasing. Status: 5 (Dispersed). Classification: Creole, Portuguese based.

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Minderico
[drc] Leiria district: Porto de Mós municipality, Mira de Aire; Santarém district: Alacanena municipality, Minde. Population: 500 (2010 V. Ferreira). Status: 8a (Moribund). Autonym: Minderico, Piação dos Charales do Ninhou. Classification: Indo-European, Italic, Romance, Italo-Western, Western, Gallo-Iberian, Ibero-Romance, West Iberian, Portuguese-Galician.

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Mirandese
[mwl] Bragança district: Miranda do Douro and Vimioso municipalities, Miranda city; Spain border. Population: 15,000 (2000). 10,000 use it regularly, 5,000 when they return to the area. 2,000 Sendinese in Sendim Vila. Status: 2 (Provincial). Statutory language of provincial identity in 4 municipalities, northeast Portugal (1999, Law No. 7-99 of 29 January). Alternate Names: Mirandês. Autonym: Mirandés. Dialects: Mirandese Central (Miranadese Normal), Mirandés Setentrional (Mirandés Raiano), Mirandés Meridional (Mirandés Sendinês, Sendinês). Classification: Indo-European, Italic, Romance, Italo-Western, Western, Gallo-Iberian, Ibero-Romance, West Iberian, Asturo-Leonese.

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Portuguese
[por] Widespread. Population: 9,900,000 in Portugal (European Commission 2012). Total users in all countries: 234,168,620 (as L1: 220,762,620; as L2: 13,406,000). Status: 1 (National). Statutory national language (2005, Constitution, Article 11(3)). Autonym: Português. Dialects: Beiran (Beirão), Alentejan (Alentejano), Algarvian (Algarvio), Minhotan (Minhoto), Transmontan (Transmontano), Madeirese (Madeirense), Azorean (Açoriano), Estremenho, Brazilian Portuguese. Standard Portuguese of Portugal based on Estremenho dialect (Lisbon and Coimbra). Classification: Indo-European, Italic, Romance, Italo-Western, Western, Gallo-Iberian, Ibero-Romance, West Iberian, Portuguese-Galician.

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Portuguese Sign Language
[psr] Scattered, including Azores and Madeira islands. Population: 52,000 in Portugal (2014 IMB). 60,000 sign language users (2014 EUD). 150,000 deaf (2010 Federação Portuguesa das Associações de Surdos). Status: 5 (Developing). Alternate Names: LGP, Língua Gestual Portuguesa. Dialects: Lisbon, Oporto. Historical influence from Swedish Sign Language [swl]. Older signers attended separate schools for boys and girls in Lisbon and Oporto, resulting in some variation by gender and region. (Van Cleve 1986) These differences have largely disappeared in younger signers. No apparent relationship to Spanish sign language, based on a lexical comparison of non-iconic signs. (Eberle and Eberle 2012). Classification: Sign language.

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