U.S. Virgin Islands

Print
American Sign Language
[ase] Scattered. 110 (Parks and Williams 2011). Estimate of 110 based on 0.1% of general population; other estimates as high as 200 (Parks and Williams 2011). Status: 5 (Developing). Alternate Names: ASL. Dialects: None known. Signed English in St. Thomas; ASL in St. Croix (Parks and Williams 2011). Classification: Sign language. Comments: Non-indigenous. ASL classes at university. Some elementary and secondary deaf students mainstreamed in private schools with special accomodations. The US Americans with Disabilities Act applies to this US territory, hence interpreters required for any governmental activity. Qualified interpreters exist but often are not readily available. Closed captioning and telecommunication relay available in some places. Annual ASL deaf camp in St. Thomas. Interaction with US Deaf community (Parks and Williams 2011).

More Information

English
[eng] 113,000 in U.S. Virgin Islands, all users. 98,000 (Crystal 2003a). 15,000 (Crystal 2003a). Status: 1 (National). De facto national language. Classification: Indo-European, Germanic, West, English. Comments: Non-indigenous.

More Information

Negerhollands
[dcr] Saint John, Saint Thomas, and Saint Croix islands. No known L1 speakers. Status: 10 (Extinct). Alternate Names: Dutch Creole. Classification: Creole, Dutch based.

More Information

Virgin Islands Creole English
[vic] 52,300 (1980). Total users in all countries: 76,500. Status: 6a (Vigorous). De facto language of national identity. Dialects: Cruzan. St. Croix, St. Eustatius, St. John, and Saba are most similar. Post-creole English (Alleyne 1985). Classification: Creole, English based, Atlantic, Eastern, Southern.

More Information

Page Views Left: