Lari

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Update on Lari language in Iran (lrl- ISO 639-3) [Map]

MuhammEd Ourang , Mon, 2019-05-06 05:51
Regarding: 
Other Comments
ISO 639-3: 
lrl
The latest maps we have designed for Lari speaking areas show Lari (viz. Lari language family and its dialects) in three provinces of Iran (Fars, Hormozgan and Bushehr) and Persian Gulf countries like UAE, Qatar and Bahrain. I will be happy to share the maps which are designed through geographic software (by consulting a friend of mine in Iran) for improving the status of Lari in Ethnologue. Please let me know if I can be of any help, Best, MuhammEd

Update on Lari language in Iran (lrl- ISO 639-3) [Writing]

MuhammEd Ourang , Mon, 2019-05-06 05:47
Regarding: 
Writing
ISO 639-3: 
lrl

The Lari language has no writing system as mentioned before. There are some poems and stories in Lari which are written in Perso-Arabic alphabet but it gets very hard for speakers to read and understand them. The reason is that the alphabet which Lari is written in is incomplete to represent all the phoneme of Lari. For instance, vowels /əʊ/, /aʊ/, /ɑɪ/ and so on can not been exhibited through the Persian diacritics. The thesis I am working on is using IPA alphabet to describe the language. IPA has the phonemes Lari is written into and can manifest the intricacies of the language phonological system. Doing so, speakers can much easier read in Lari and communicate through text to each other. It should be mentioned that the orthography design is being worked on by Ourang (forthcoming) and the result of research will be used in writing the first educational book for teaching Lari to speakers of Aheli (as one of the dialects of Lari). So, the 'Arabic script, Nastaliq variant' does not seem appropriate. Nastaliq is usually used in calligraphy of Persian rather than writing an endangered language. I personally have not seen any Lari speaker write their mother tongue in Nastaliq though there are some texts in Perso-Arabic script.

Editorial Action

We will change our information to show that Lari [lrl] is unwritten and will include this information in the next edition of the Ethnologue.

Update on Lari language in Iran (lrl- ISO 639-3) [Language Development]

MuhammEd Ourang , Mon, 2019-05-06 05:36
Regarding: 
Language Development
ISO 639-3: 
lrl

Although revitalisation/development of Lari is in its infancy, there have been some efforts including grammar books of the language, among which we can name Khonji (2009) and numerous Master’s theses (Musavi (2017); Tale’yi (2012); Ourang (2012) inter alia) who have contributed to the scholarship on the Lari language family. The first fieldwork research, which is conducted based on a semi-structured questionnaire and recorded in video and audio, is conducted by Ourang (2018) where nearly 10 hours of the interview episodes are collected and transcribed in IPA. Some of the total 45 interviews (in one-to-one and one-to-some forms) are annotated through ELAN and archived on UNSW Archive. Therefore, the efforts for Lari are beyond mere dictionary writing.

Editorial Action

We will add some information on language documentation that has been published for Lari [lrl] in Iran, to be included in the next edition of the Ethnologue.

Update on Lari language in Iran (lrl- ISO 639-3) [Language Use]

MuhammEd Ourang , Mon, 2019-05-06 05:34
Regarding: 
Language Use
ISO 639-3: 
lrl

The language is not used, as mentioned in other discussions, in education nor Lari is used in media or news area. So, the 'vigorous' is not an appropriate title to the language and as mentioned in the status of the language, 'endangered' describes the language in a better way. Apart from Lari and Persian, there are some speakers of Turkic family, Arabic and Lori in Larestan and other areas.

Editorial Action

No action taken.

Update on Lari language in Iran (lrl- ISO 639-3) [Dialects]

MuhammEd Ourang , Mon, 2019-05-06 05:25
Regarding: 
Dialects
ISO 639-3: 
lrl

As mentioned briefly, the dialects are scattered in the provinces and include more than 21 dialects (Salami, 2004), the most important of which are ‘Lari’, ‘Gerashi’, ‘Evazi’, ‘Khonji’, ‘Aheli’, ‘Galedari’ and ‘Ashkanani’ (in Fars Province), ‘Bastaki’, ‘Lengeyi’, ‘Ashnezi’ (in Hormozgan Province) and ‘Dayyeri’ (in Boushehr Province). It should be mentioned that the there is a mutual intelligibility between each two dialects of Lari but there might be differences in phonological, morphological and syntactical areas among them (Khonji, 2009).

Editorial Action

No action taken.  Dialect names for Lari [lrl] in Iran were added from previous feedback.

Update on Lari language in Iran (lrl- ISO 639-3) [Language Status]

MuhammEd Ourang , Mon, 2019-05-06 05:24
Regarding: 
Language Status
ISO 639-3: 
lrl

This information needs real update as during years of Farsi domination on Lari-speaking areas and deprivation of education in the mother tongue have drastically deteriorated the language status in Iran. Furthermore, the language has no writing system or orthography, the domains of use are restricted to home and children are forced to learn Persian (Farsi) as the official language of Iran when they enter schools at the age of 7. Moreover, lack of media coverage and educational books have causes speakers shift towards teaching Persian to kids rather than focusing on Lari. It is worth mentioning that negative attitudes of parents have been influential in endangerment of the language. Therefore, the endangerment level for Lari language based on Ourang’s calculation in his thesis is 44%, which categorises Lari as ‘Endangered’ language not 'vigorous'.

Editorial Action

We will update what we have on the language status for Lari [lrl] in Iran based on this information, to be published in the next edition of the Ethnologue.

Update on Lari language in Iran (lrl- ISO 639-3) [Location]

MuhammEd Ourang , Mon, 2019-05-06 05:14
Regarding: 
Location
ISO 639-3: 
lrl

Not only is the Lari language spoken in Lar, but it also is spoken in three provinces of Iran and some Persian Gulf countries as below described: Lari language family is divided into various dialects which are spoken in three province of Iran: Fars, Boushehr and Hormozgan. Therefore, the dialects are scattered in the provinces and include more than 21 dialects, the most important of which are ‘Lari’, ‘Gerashi’, ‘Evazi’, ‘Khonji’, ‘Aheli’, ‘Galedari’ and ‘Ashkanani’ (in Fars Province), ‘Bastaki’, ‘Lengeyi’, ‘Ashnezi’ (in Hormozgan Province) and ‘Dayyeri’ (in Boushehr Province). It should be mentioned that the there is a mutual intelligibility between each two dialects of Lari but there might be differences in phonological, morphological and syntactical areas among them.

Editorial Action

The location and dialect name information for Lari [lrl] in Iran will be added to the Ethnologue database and will appear in the next edition of the Ethnologue.

Update on Lari language in Iran (lrl- ISO 639-3) [Population]

MuhammEd Ourang , Mon, 2019-05-06 05:12
Regarding: 
Population
ISO 639-3: 
lrl

The population of all Lari-speaking areas according to the latest census in 2016 conducted by the Statistical Centre of Iran (SCI) in three provinces of Fars, Hormozgan and Bushehr is between 200,000-250,000 which include those who have immigrated to Persian Gulf countries such as UAE, Bahrain, Kuwait and Qatar during 1970s (Ourang, forthcoming).

Editorial Action

No action taken.

Update on Lari language in Iran (lrl- ISO 639-3)

MuhammEd Ourang , Mon, 2019-05-06 05:11
Regarding: 
Alternate Names
ISO 639-3: 
lrl

The name ‘Achomi’ is self-denomination and self-referent name which is used by non-Lari speakers in Persian Gulf countries to address the language and those who speak it in a rude, offensive manner. Achomi is entirely vulgar and has no academic background in scholarship of the Lari language. Therefore, it’s requested that there be an asterisk before the title: *Achomi (vulgar).

Editorial Action

We will indicate that Achomi is a pejorative name for Luri [lrl] in Iran, to be included in the next edition of the Ethnologue.